I’m part of the 3.5%

“I’d like to ask you to imagine that you live in a very repressive country. There are elections, but they are fake. The leader wins 100% of the vote each time. Security forces beat up opposition leaders with impunity, and they harass everyone else.” – Dr. Erica Chenoweth, September 21, 2013

 

Imagine that you live in a very repressive country.

There are elections,

but they are fake.

 

Imagine.

 

In 2011, Erica Chenoweth and Maria Stephan published a groundbreaking study about the impact of civil resistance in the 21st Century. Chenoweth admits that she began the research as a bit of a skeptic, she felt that nonviolent action education “well-intentioned, but dangerously naive.”

Over two years, Chenoweth and Stephan examined 323 nonviolent and violent campaigns throughout the world, all of which took place between 1900 – 2006. They focused on actions that involved at least 1,000 participants and resulted in the overthrow of a government or a territorial liberation of some kind.

What their research concluded that the nonviolent opposition campaigns were actually more than twice as successful in achieving their political objectives.

 

nonviolentcampaign

from Why Civil Resistance Works The Strategic Logic of Nonviolent Conflict, by Erica Chenoweth, Maria J Stephan

 

Nonviolent opposition

is more than

twice

as successful.

 

The research also showed that this trend has been increasing over time, even in those extremely brutal authoritarian conditions where the researchers expected non-violent resistance to fail.

In her 2013 TED Talk, Chenoweth said:

“Researchers used to say that no government can survive if just 5% of its population rose up against it, but what the research showed is that no single campaigns failed during the time period after they’d achieved the

active

sustained

participation of just

3.5 percent of the population.

 

In the US today, that’s about 11 million people.

On average, non-violent campaigns were

four times larger

than the average violent campaign and they were often

much more inclusive and representative

in terms of

gender,

age,

race,

political party,

class and

urban-rural distinction.

Civil resistance allows people of all different levels of physical ability to participate.

This can include

the elderly

people with disabilities

women

children and

anyone who else wants to.

 

If you think about it, everyone is born with a natural physical ability to resist non-violently.  Anyone who has kids knows how hard it is to pick up a child who doesn’t want to move or to feed a child who doesn’t want to eat.”

 

Imagine that you live in a very repressive country.

There are elections,

but they are fake.

 

Imagine.

 

Now let’s say you’ve had enough.

That’s where I am tonight.

 

It turns out that there are blueprints for making this kind of thing happen. And if you’re ready to act, I’ve got a map and a flashlight.

Tonight’s action:

If you’re part of the 3.5% of the population who are willing to engage in active sustained nonviolent participation, tag 3 people on social media you know you can count on to join us. Feel free to tag this post or a link the video below with the words:

I’m part of the 3.5%.twitter-bird

Invite your friends to watch the video below, and ask them to tag 3 people they know who can be counted on to join us.

I’ll be back soon.

What’s On My Nightstand: June 2018

Fiction

There, There / Tommy Orange

 

Short Fiction

“Without Inspection” | Edwidge Danticat

People Like You | Margaret Malone

Nonfiction

Emergent Strategy | Adrienne Maree Brown

Who Will Speak for America? | edited by Stephanie Feldman and Nathaniel Popkin

Hope in the Dark: Untold Histories, Wild Possibilities |Rebecca Solnit

Tao Te Ching | Lao Tsu

 

Journal

The Paris Review, Summer 2018

 

Essay / Interview / OpEd

Dear Ijeawele, or a Feminist Manifesto in Fifteen Suggestions | Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie

Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie Comes to Terms with Global Fame | Larissa MacFarquhar

 

Poetry

If Not, Winter: Fragments of Sappho | Ann Carson

For You / Sharon Olds

 

Magazine / Newspaper

Lesbian Connection: free to lesbians worldwide, but the suggested donation is $7/issue (more if you can, less if you can’t)

The New Yorker

The Week

The Shuttle – Weaver’s Way Coop

 

Random 

rock: “There will be rough times and hard times, but you can never be put down” – Alexander, age 8

180 | Mnemosyne notebook

Blessing Spray: palo santo + selenite | Ark Made

June 30 flyers

 

 

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What’s On My Nightstand: May 2018

Fiction

La Bastarda, Trifonia Melibea Obono

The God of Small Things, Arundhati Roy

brown girl dreaming, by Jacqueline Woodson

 

Short Fiction

Without Inspection, by Edwidge Danticat

The Long Black Line, by John L’Heureux

 

Nonfiction

we are never meeting in real life. by Samantha Irby

Energy Transmutation Between-Ness and Transmission, by Richard Rose

 

Journal

The Paris Review, Spring 2018

 

Essay / Interview / OpEd

Why Are We So Fascinated by Cults? by Kirstin Allio (The Paris Review)

What Just Happened in Malaysia? by Tash Aw (The New York Times)

Stop mocking Kim Kardashian West for caring about prison reform, by Chandra Bozelko (Los Angeles Times)

 

Poetry

The morning after / my death, by Etel Adnan

The Universe in Verse, by Maya Angelou

Testament Scratched into a Water Station Barrel (Partial Translation), by Eduardo C. Corrall

Reconsolidation: Or, It’s the Ghosts Who Will Answer You, by Janice Lee

Marina, by Cynthia Zarin

 

Monograph

A Commonplace Book, by Christina McPhee

 

Magazine / Newspaper

Lesbian Connection

The New Yorker

The Week

The Shuttle – Weaver’s Way Coop

 

Random 

paper cranes

peonies

map of Portland, OR

map of Powell’s Bookstore

day planner, Mon Carnet de Poche

Rosebud Salve

purple pony

 

 

About

Publications

Postage

Teaching

What’s On My Nightstand: April 2018

Fiction

Future Home of the Living God, by Louise Erdrich

Underground Railroad, by Colson Whitehead

 

 

Short Fiction

Scapegoat Child, by Kathleen Collins

What it Means When a Man Falls From the Sky, by Lesley Nneka Arimah

 

Nonfiction

The Little Book of Feminist Saints, by Julia Pierpont

May Cause Happiness, from the teachings of Brother David Steindl Rast

 

 

Journal

Big Big Wednesday, Issue Five, Fall 2017: Stranger

The Paris Review, Spring 2018

 

 

Essay / Interview / OpEd

Will We Stop Trump Before It’s Too Late? by Madeleine Albright (The NY Times)

Pruning Rose of Sharon Shrub, by Becca Badgett

Eileen Myles, When Dogs and Mothers Die, by Carlie Fishgold (Guernica)

How Women See How Male Authors See Them, by Katy Waldman (The New Yorker)

 

 

Poetry

Hold: A Poem, by Gowri Koneswaran

 

 

Magazine / Newspaper

Lesbian Connection

The New Yorker

The Week

The Shuttle – Weaver’s Way Coop

 

Random 

palo santo wood

ceramic bowl

Rosebud Salve

pot of thyme

pot of basil

staples

earbuds

dream journal

pen

About

Publications

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S1:E4 “Pathétique”

Today the fourth episode of my ongoing series was published at Corporeal Clamor. I think of it as “Trumpian Gothic,” a love story for these strange times. I’ve woven classical music throughout, and Beethoven’s “Pathétique” is one of my favorites. I’ve included a recording of myself playing the Pathétique about halfway through the chapter, or you can watch the warm-up on Facebook.

Thanks for reading – I’ve been so appreciative of your enthusiasm for this series.

“To play a wrong note is insignificant; to play without passion is inexcusable.”
― Ludwig van Beethoven


 

We watch. The dog cocks a scraggy yellow ear behind him, listening for the door. Waiting, probably, for Tala to return. So we have this in common.

I kneel so slowly it’s hardly movement, but the dog drops his head and backs toward the front door, eyes locked on mine. Is it anger or fear? I don’t know dogs, and seeing as Tala has left him in my care, she doesn’t know me. I hold out my hand and his nostrils flare. He cranes his thick neck a few inches forward toward my fingers –

A muffled ring:

my body understands the sound before meaning registers, a hot surge through my arms. I shriek and the dog darts behind the couch. On the second ring, I turn and tear past piled papers and boxes and plates and books, pull the keyring from the side table drawer. On the third ring, I scramble with the tiny key, fiddle with the padlock on the door to the hidden cupboard beneath the stairs. The padlock pops, on the fourth ring, I throw open the door, duck and crawl, and as the fifth and final ring begins, I reach for the old yellow phone –

“Hello?”

Read S1E4 “Pathétique” here.


Publications

S1:E3 “Moonlight,” Corporeal Clamor

S1:E2 “The Introvert’s Guide to Impeachment,” Corporeal Clamor

S1: E1 “Lock Her Up, Corporeal Clamor

These Days, Corporeal Clamor.

You are the Rest of Us, Corporeal Clamor.

Over Everything, Corporeal Clamor.

Test Tank, Corporeal Clamor.

You say, write something hopeful, Corporeal Clamor.

Make a Little Birdhouse in Your Soul, Corporeal Clamor.

You Can Do Anything, Corporeal Clamor.

The Right to Bare Arms, ENTROPY Magazine.

Still Gonna Do (#ShePersisted), The Manifest-Station.

Postage

LeighHereNow

PO Box 27771

Philadelphia, PA

19118, USA

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What’s On My Nightstand: February 2018

 

Fiction

Lucky Boy, by Shanthi Sekaran

SHTUM, by Jem Lester

 

Memoir

Heart Berries, by Teresa Marie Mailhot

Priestdaddy, by Patricia Lockwood

Twenty Horses, by Nancy E. Peter

 

Nonfiction

Thoughts on Solitude, by Thomas Merton

Hope in the Dark, by Rebecca Solnit

 

Poetry

Why I Wake Early, by Mary Oliver

 

Magazine / Newspaper

Lesbian Connection

The New Yorker

The Week

The Shuttle – Weaver’s Way Coop

 

Random 

paper clips

thumbtacks

Blue Marble Bookstore 2018 book challenge card

plant cutting

pebbles

rock:

“There will be rough times but you can never be put down.” – Alexander, age 7 (at the time of inscription)

 

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Publications

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Teaching