Tag Archives: reading list

What’s on my Nightstand: March 2019

Nonfiction

Deep Creek: Finding Hope in the High Country, by Pam Houston

The Way of Chuang Tzu, by Thomas Merton

Era of Ignition, by Amber Tamblyn

From Dictatorship to Democracy, Gene Sharp 

The Methods of Nonviolent Action, by Gene Sharp

Occasional Magic – The Moth (True Stories About Defying the Impossible)

Fiction

The Queen of the Night, by Alexander Chee

Before She Was Harriet, by Lesa Cline-Ransome

Short Fiction

‘The Office of Missing Persons’ by Akil Kumaraswamy (Lit Hub)

‘The Frog King,’ by Garth Greenwell (The New Yorker)

‘Motherland,’ by Min Jin Lee (The Missouri Review)

Poetry

Elizabeth Bishop, The Complete Poems: 1927 – 1979

Enough Music, by Dorianne Laux

Goodbye to Tolerance, by Denise Levertov

Essay / Interview / OpEd (Selected)

The Phenom: ‘Change Is Closer Than We Think.’ Inside Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez’s Unlikely Rise,’ by Charlotte Alter

8 Short Kids’ Films Every Mini-Feminist Should See, by Emma Davey

Thesomorphia, by Melissa Febos

The Thread: Down Girl (The Rumpus) by Marissa Korbel

Against Catharsis: Writing is Not Therapy, by T Kira Madden

Voices of Addiction: All the Ways to Save Your Life,(The Rumpus) by David M. Olsen

Patti Smith discusses activism in the age of Trump: ‘I’m not going down with the ship, that’s for certain’ by Randall Roberts

AACK! Cathy Guisewite made a wildly successful comic strip by and for women. But to her critics, she’s just another example of compromised feminism by Rachel Syme

Magazine / Newspaper

Lesbian Connection: free to lesbians worldwide, but the suggested donation is $7/issue (more if you can, less if you can’t), January/February 2019 issue

The New Yorker

The Week

TIME

SIERRA Magazine

Random

booda butter – naked lip balm

El Sueño Americano (The American Dream) – exhibition card, Tom Kiefer

abalone shell, palo santo wood, dried rose buds

Chill Pill – Aura Cacia Essential Oil Blend

necklace (shells, leather suede), Little Green Apple Jewelry

beach stones

Mexican tile (coaster)

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3.5 % Project

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What’s on my Nightstand: January 2019

Nonfiction

Riot Days, by Maria Alyokhina

Brazil, by Elizabeth Bishop and LIFE Magazine (1962)

Beautiful Country Burn Again: Democracy, Rebellion, and Revolution, by Ben Fountain

From Dictatorship to Democracy, Gene Sharp *

The Body Keeps the Score: Brain, Mind, and Body in the Healing of Trauma, by Bessel A. van der Volk

Dear America: Notes of an Undocumented Citizen, by Jose Antonio Vargas

* NOTE: on Wednesday, January 31, Gene Sharp passed away peacefully in his home at the age of 90. Professor Sharp is the author of the research and works that sparked the 3.5% Project.

 

Fiction

Florida, by Lauren Groff

 

Short Fiction

“Death Constant Beyond Love,” by Gabriel García Márquez

“Cream,” Haruki Murakami

 

Poetry

Elizabeth Bishop, The Complete Poems: 1927 – 1979

“Resignation,” by Nikki Giovanni

“Knots,” by RD Laing

“Good Bones,” by Maggie Smith

 

Journal

Granta

The Paris Review, No. 227, Winter 2018

 

Essay / Interview / OpEd

“The Quiet American,” by Janine Di Giovanni, The New York Times

The Racist, Homophobic Attack on Jussie Smollett Is Far-Right America’s Endgame, by Joshua Rivera, GQ Magazine

“The Thread: Fatherless,” by Marissa Korbel, The Rumpus

“Teaching my daughter that love is love,” by Vanessa Martir, The Washington Post

“The Radicalization of Bedtime Stories,” by Joe Pinsker, The Atlantic

 

Catalogue

Mt. Airy Learning Tree Winter 2019 Course Catalogue

 

Magazine / Newspaper

Lesbian Connection: free to lesbians worldwide, but the suggested donation is $7/issue (more if you can, less if you can’t), January/February 2019 issue

The New Yorker

The Week

 

Random

HURRAW! moonbalm

worry stone, glass

Mexican tile (coaster)

Pixel computer glasses

Smith’s Rosebud Salve

 

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What’s On My Nightstand: December 2018

Nonfiction/Memoir

Some Bright Morning I’ll Fly Away, by Alice Anderson

When They Call You a Terrorist: A Black Lives Matter Memoir, by Asha Bandele and Patrisse Cullors

Dreaming the Dark: Magic, Sex, and Politics, by Starhawk

Fiction

Blood and Guts in High School, by Kathy Acker

The Answers: A Novel, by Catherine Lacey

Short Fiction

“Surplus Male,” by Caitlin Bagwell, NUNUM

“Acceptance Journey,” by Mary Gaitskill

“Staring at His Converse Tennis Shoes,” by Anne Gudger, 50-Word Stories

“Two Sisters,” by Ludmilla Petrushkevskaya

“Time for the Eyes to Adjust,” by Lin Ullman

Young Adult Fiction

The Hate You Give, by Angie Thomas

Poetry

“Prognosis,” by Meena Alexander

“Arrival at Santos,” by Elizabeth Bishop

“Dinah,” by Sarah Blake

“Saturday,” by Caryl Pagel

“The Sagittarius” and “A Song of Monsoon and Blood Lava,” by Pamela K. Santos

Journal

The Paris Review, No. 227, Winter 2018

Ploughshares Fall 2018

Essay / Interview / OpEd

“Roxane Gay: ‘Public Discourse Rarely Allows for Nuance. And see where that’s gotten us,” by Aida Edemarium, The Guardian

“The Thread: Outside the Gaze,” by Marissa Korbel, The Rumpus

“I Used to Give Men Mercy,” by Therese Mailhot, Guernica

“Why You Should Be One Too?” by Spencer Reed, Granta

Catalogue

Mt. Airy Learning Tree Winter 2019 Course Catalogue

Magazine / Newspaper

Lesbian Connection: free to lesbians worldwide, but the suggested donation is $7/issue (more if you can, less if you can’t), January/February 2019 issue

The New Yorker

The Week

Random

author photo (below), photograph and styling by Gracie, age 5

HURRAW! lipbalm

pomegranate majolica dish

hummingbird Xmas ornament, made by Nicolle

ginger cookies, made by Echo Bodine)

Smith’s Rosebud Salve

lavender bath salts, made by Charlotte

Leigh_by Gracie_Xmas2018

author photo, photograph and styling by Gracie, age 5

About

3.5 % Project

Publications

Postage

Teaching

What’s On My Nightstand: November 2018

Nonfiction/Memoir

When They Call You a Terrorist: A Black Lives Matter Memoir, by Asha Bandele and Patrisse Cullors

Art & Fear: Observations On the Perils (and Rewards) of Artmaking, by David Bayles and Ted Orland

The Art of Misdiagnosis: Surviving My Mother’s Suicide, by Gayle Brandeis

The Constitution Today: Timeless Lessons for the Issues of our Era, by Akhil Reed Amar

Fiction

The Last to See Me, by M. Dressler

Short Fiction

“The Deer-Vehicle Collision Survivors Support Group,” by Porochista Khakpour (Guernica)

“The Proxy Marriage,” by Maile Malloy (The New Yorker)

“The Sex Lives of African Girls,” by Taiye Selasi, (Granta)

Young Adult Fiction

The Hate You Give, by Angie Thomas

Music Together Teacher Training Manual

“Hello, Everybody!” Music Together: Family Favorites

Poetry

“Perhaps the World Ends Here,” by Joy Harjo

Leaves of Grass, by Walt Whitman

The Love Poems of Rumi, edited by Deepak Chopra

Journal

Carnegie Science, Fall 2018

The Paris Review, Issue 225

Ploughshares Fall 2018

Essay / Interview / OpEd

Toward a More Radical Selfie, by India Ennenga (The Paris Review)

The Guardian view on Donald Trump’s credibility: America’s compromised leader (The Guardian)

Meet the New Freshmen in Congress: More Democrats, Diversity and Women, by Catie Edmonson and Jasmine C. Lee

Magazine / Newspaper

Lesbian Connection: free to lesbians worldwide, but the suggested donation is $7/issue (more if you can, less if you can’t)

The New Yorker

The Week

Vanity Fair

Random

beach shells

Betron earbuds

blue light blocking glasses, Pixel

The Master Key pitch pipe

ukulele cheat sheet

 

About

Publications

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Teaching

What’s On My Nightstand: August September October 2018

I was posting the pile on my nightstand every month but got sidetracked, so I’m sure I’ve missed something. A quick note on two important favorites:

The Reckonings, by Lacy M. Johnson

When I read my friend Kelly Thompson’s Guernica interview and this NPR review of Lacy Johnson’s newest book of essays, I knew I needed to own a copy. This morning I read the last paragraph of the first essay about ten times while crying into my coffee. If you’re a trauma survivor, this book is a balm.

The Constitution Today: Timeless Lessons for the Issues of our Era, by Akhil Reed Amar

I don’t remember how I heard about this 2016 book on constitutional journalism by Yale law professor, Akhil Amar. I ordered it from my public library and received a notice that it was available yesterday, just hours after the GOP-in-Chief announced that he was rethinking the 14th Amendment. The Constitution Today is described as a “handbook for thinking constitutionally about today’s headlines,” and I’m already knee-deep.  (Check out p. 240 for a breakdown of what the 14th Amendment has to do with same-sex marriage for your daily dose of brain-burning.)

What’s On My Nightstand

Fiction

An American Marriage, by Tayari Jones

Silver Sparrow, by Tayari Jones

The Vampire Gideon’s Suicide Hotline & Halfway House for Orphaned Girls, by Andrew Katz

Bell Canto, by Ann Patchett

 

Short Fiction

We’ll Always Have Paris: Stories, by Ray Bradbury

“Cecilia Awakened,” by Tessa Hadley

“The Wind Cave,” by Haruki Murakami

Sour Heart, by Jenny Zhang

 

Children’s Fiction

Catwings, by Ursula K. LeGuin

Quiet, by Tomie de Paola

 

Nonfiction

The Constitution Today: Timeless Lessons for the Issues of our Era, by Akhil Reed Amar

The Reckonings, by Lacy M. Johnson

You Are a Badass®: How to Stop Doubting Your Greatness and Start Living an Awesome Life, by Jen Sincero

 

Journal

The Paris Review, Issue 225

Ploughshares Fall 2018

 

Essay / Interview / OpEd

“You’re Disillusioned. That’s Fine. Vote Anyway,” by Roxane Gay, The New York Times

“Lacy M. Johnson: Moving the Conversation Toward Justice,” by Kelly Thompson, Guernica

“Maltese for Beginners,” by Judith Thurman

 

Poetry

“Brett Kavanaugh Does the Dishes,” by Katherine Harer

“Epithalamium,” by Sarah Holland-Batt

“Little Dog’s Rhapsody in the Night” by Mary Oliver

“Bees,” by Maya Ribault

 

Magazine / Newspaper

Lesbian Connection: free to lesbians worldwide, but the suggested donation is $7/issue (more if you can, less if you can’t)

The New Yorker

The Week

Vanity Fair

 

Random 

“I VOTE / I MUST” button (given to me by my local postal worker after we talked about the pipe bombs sent and I showed her my “VOTE” t-shirt. She reached behind her and dug through a box and said “A sweet old lady named Mrs. Lovejoy makes these buttons, and she said to give them to whoever needs them, so I’m giving this one to you.”)

birthday card, by Atticus

ukulele cheat sheet

Bach’s Rescue Remedy

library card, Free Library of Philadelphia

 

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Step 9: “Resisting plot is a political act”

When Lidia Yuknavitch spoke these words at her workshop last May, I scribbled them in my notebook and something broke loose. My entire life has resisted plot, and seeing my writing life in this context was more than pivotal – it’s become a daily mantra. (If you’re nodding your head, you know.) Art as an act of political resistance is the theme of Step 9, but first, a quick announcement:

melidleighIn November, I’ll be joining Lidia Yuknavitch as an online workshop leader for Epistemologies: Writing to Unmake and Remake Meaning. Over the past year, I’ve been a columnist and the curator of Corporeal Clamor, a curated series at Corporeal Writing. Part of the CW philosophy is “leading people into new and unknown territories from which they can make art,” and because I so love collaborating with other writers, this new role at Corporeal Writing sets my heart on fire.

Class begins November 4.

Over the past two years, the writers I’ve met through Corporeal Writing are part of a revolution. They’re publishing pieces like this one by my friend Marissa in Harper’s Bazaar, and last week, NPR featured artist Laura Gibson’s song “Domestication.” Laura was working on lyrics to the song when she took the “Exhausting Metaphor” workshop at Corporeal Writing a year ago. As an added bonus, Anya Pearson, who she met at the workshop, plays a character in the video.

This is what Lidia means when she calls Corporeal Writing “a creative process that values participant collaboration.” If this idea sets a fire inside of you and you’ve got something to say, come write with us.

IMG_3256.JPG

Step 9: Leaflets, Pamphlets, and Books

Step 9 in the “blueprint” From Dictatorship to Democracy emphasizes the critical role of artists and intellectuals in making political and social change. Lidia Yuknavitch’s The Book of Joan was released just after T– entered the White House, and the post-apocalyptic nature of the work struck a chord with the public.

From the New York Times Book Review:

“Telling the truth with precision and rage and a visionary’s eye, using both realism and fabulism, is one way to break through the white noise of a consumerist culture that tries to commodify post-apocalyptic fiction, to render it safe.” – Jeff VanderMeer, A Brilliant, Incendiary Joan of Arc Story for a Ravaged Earth, The New York Times

Throughout history, times of political turmoil have been influenced by works of art. My project 3.5% was inspired by a pamphlet by Gene Sharp that has been passed around the globe since its release in 1993. Others on the list of transgressive game-changers:

The Republic – Plato

Liberty Leading the People – Eugène Delacroix

A Room of One’s Own – Virginia Wolfe

The Jungle – Upton Sinclair

1984 – George Orwell

Beloved – Toni Morrison

To Kill a Mockingbird – Harper Lee

When Things Fall Apart – Chinua Achebe

50 books that changed the world.

15 Banned Books

What’s on your list?

Share it in the comments.

What’s On My Nightstand: July 2018

Fiction

Two Spoons of Bitter | Sonja S. Mongar

The Catcher in the Rye |JD Salinger *

*missed it in high school

 

Short Fiction

Under the Wave | Lauren Groff

Pause | Mary Ruefle

The Blackout | Kelly Thompson

 

Nonfiction

Emergent Strategy | Adrienne Maree Brown

Ten Arguments for Deleting Your Social Media Account Right Now | Jaron Lanier

Energy Transmutation Between-ness and Transmission | Richard Rose

Hope in the Dark: Untold Histories, Wild Possibilities |Rebecca Solnit

How to Love | Thich Nhat Hanh

 

Memoir

Pastrix | Nadia Bolz-Weber

 

Journal

The Paris Review, Summer 2018

 

Essay / Interview / OpEd

Why I helped organize the ‘Handmaids’ protest of Mike Pence| Samantha Goldman

American Garbage | Marissa Korbel

From Dictatorship to Democracy | Gene Sharp

The Saddest Children’s Book in the World | Yevgeniya Traps

 

Poetry

Call Me By My True Names|Thich Nhat Hanh

Running| The New Yorker | Joy Harjo

 

Magazine / Newspaper

Lesbian Connection: free to lesbians worldwide, but the suggested donation is $7/issue (more if you can, less if you can’t)

The New Yorker

The Week

 

Random 

pine cone

 

 

About

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Teaching