Tag Archives: impeach

What’s on my Nightstand: May 2019

Nonfiction / Memoir

The Line Becomes a River: Dispatches from the Border, by Francisco Cantú

Long Live the Tribe of Fatherless Girls, by T Kira Madden

California Calling, by Natalie Singer

From Dictatorship to Democracy, Gene Sharp 

Fiction

Girls Burn Brighter, by Shobha Rao

Short Fiction

Large Animals, by Jess Arndt

Brawler, by Lauren Groff (The New Yorker)

When the Tide of Misfortune Hits, Even Jelly Will Break Your Teeth, by Porochista Khakpour (Gulf Coast)

Breeding Season, by Amanda Niehaus

Poetry / Chapbook

Elizabeth Bishop: The Complete Poems: 1927 – 1979

The Economy of Nostalgia, by Cooper Lee Bombardier

Naked, by Nastashia Minto

Essay (Selected)

Don’t Use My Family for Your True Crime Stories, by Lilly Dancyger (Crime Reads)

Percolations, by Daniel Elder (Entropy)

Is Masculinity a Terrorist Ideology? by Lacy M. Johnson (LitHub)

The Thread: The Stories We’ve Been Told by Marissa Korbel (The Rumpus)

Voices on Addiction: Fault Lines, by Lauren Marker (The Rumpus)

Interview / OpEd (Selected)

How Trump has already changed immigration policy, by Joshua Barajas (PBS News Hour)

Psychogeography of Abandonment: An Interview with Sophia Shalmiyev, by Cooper Lee Bombardier (BOMB Magazine)

What Can the U.S. Learn From How Other Countries Handle Immigration? by  and 

Interview: Nastashia Minto, editor Katie Collins Guinn (NAILED)

This Gen X Mess, by Lisa Frank (The New York Times)

Why Aren’t the Democratic Presidential Candidates Talking About Immigration More? by Onita Nwanevu (The New Yorker)

Letters to Mothers: Crones, Hags, Witches, and Killjoys, by Sophia Shalmiyev and Leni Zumas (Guernica)

How ‘I got a plan’ became a thing: Warren nerds out and the crowds go crazy, by Alex Thompson (Politico)

Magazine / Newspaper

Lesbian Connection: free to lesbians worldwide, but the suggested donation is $7/issue (more if you can, less if you can’t), January/February 2019 issue

The New Yorker

The Week

TIME

SIERRA Magazine

Random

Rosebud Lip Salve

seed packets, pea shoots and mixed sprouts

ceramic bowl, Paula Winokur

foxglove blossoms

robin’s egg

HURRAW! moonbalm

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What’s on my Nightstand: March 2019

Nonfiction

Deep Creek: Finding Hope in the High Country, by Pam Houston

The Way of Chuang Tzu, by Thomas Merton

Era of Ignition, by Amber Tamblyn

From Dictatorship to Democracy, Gene Sharp 

The Methods of Nonviolent Action, by Gene Sharp

Occasional Magic – The Moth (True Stories About Defying the Impossible)

Fiction

The Queen of the Night, by Alexander Chee

Before She Was Harriet, by Lesa Cline-Ransome

Short Fiction

‘The Office of Missing Persons’ by Akil Kumaraswamy (Lit Hub)

‘The Frog King,’ by Garth Greenwell (The New Yorker)

‘Motherland,’ by Min Jin Lee (The Missouri Review)

Poetry

Elizabeth Bishop, The Complete Poems: 1927 – 1979

Enough Music, by Dorianne Laux

Goodbye to Tolerance, by Denise Levertov

Essay / Interview / OpEd (Selected)

The Phenom: ‘Change Is Closer Than We Think.’ Inside Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez’s Unlikely Rise,’ by Charlotte Alter

8 Short Kids’ Films Every Mini-Feminist Should See, by Emma Davey

Thesomorphia, by Melissa Febos

The Thread: Down Girl (The Rumpus) by Marissa Korbel

Against Catharsis: Writing is Not Therapy, by T Kira Madden

Voices of Addiction: All the Ways to Save Your Life,(The Rumpus) by David M. Olsen

Patti Smith discusses activism in the age of Trump: ‘I’m not going down with the ship, that’s for certain’ by Randall Roberts

AACK! Cathy Guisewite made a wildly successful comic strip by and for women. But to her critics, she’s just another example of compromised feminism by Rachel Syme

Magazine / Newspaper

Lesbian Connection: free to lesbians worldwide, but the suggested donation is $7/issue (more if you can, less if you can’t), January/February 2019 issue

The New Yorker

The Week

TIME

SIERRA Magazine

Random

booda butter – naked lip balm

El Sueño Americano (The American Dream) – exhibition card, Tom Kiefer

abalone shell, palo santo wood, dried rose buds

Chill Pill – Aura Cacia Essential Oil Blend

necklace (shells, leather suede), Little Green Apple Jewelry

beach stones

Mexican tile (coaster)

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Method 27: New Signs and Names

Before I move on to Method 27, two words:

Brandy Carlile.

61st Annual Grammy Awards, Show, Los Angeles, USA - 10 Feb 2019

Photo by Rob Latour/REX/Shutterstock (10095018ic) Brandi Carlile 61st Annual Grammy Awards, Show, Los Angeles, USA – 10 Feb 2019

Carlile’s performance of “The Joke” at last night’s Grammy awards has been on repeat all day. It’s one of the most powerful, timely performances I’ve seen, and I just can’t get it out of my head. Watch the performance.

They come to kick dirt in your face
To call you weak and then displace you
After carrying your baby on your back across the desert
I saw your eyes behind your hair
And you’re looking tired, but you don’t look scared

Artists are leading the revolution.

Method 27: New Signs and Names

IMG_5203Method 27 can take many forms, but the approach is to take signs that have been used against people and to turn them into something new. The signs can be repurposed, they can disappear or be replaced with something new.

When I was researching this method, I came across today’s LA Times, “Last of iconic illegal immigration crossing signs has vanished in California.” After years of debate, the last of 10 yellow “immigrants crossing” signs that once stood on either side of the 5 and 805 freeways near the U.S.-Mexico border disappeared. The department of transportation stopped making the signs and constructed fences to prevent people from crossing highways instead. (See slideshow, below.)

Method 27 was used in 1942 in occupied Poland by a group of young resistors who called themselves “The Little Wolves.” They stole the signs reading “Nur Für Deutsche” (FOR GERMANS ONLY), signs that were posted in front of Warsaw’s best cafes, hotels and theaters. One morning, hundreds of the signs reappeared on city’s lamp posts and trees where the Germans often hung Polish patriots. Overnight, street signs, placards and inscriptions throughout the city were replaced with the names of the heroes of the revolution.

I featured the artist Banksy in Method 26: “Paint as Protest,” and he’s back again today. A warning that the images in the slideshow below are triggering, but they end on a note we can all live by. I recommend listening to Brandi Carlile as you watch. [Listen.]

Let ’em live while they can
Let ’em spin, let ’em scatter in the wind
I have been to the movies, I’ve seen how it ends
And the joke’s on them.

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“Researchers used to say that no government can survive if just 5% of its population rose up against it, but what the research showed is that no single campaigns failed during the time period after they’d achieved the active sustained participation of just 3.5 percent of the population.” – Erica Chenoweth

What’s on my Nightstand: January 2019

Nonfiction

Riot Days, by Maria Alyokhina

Brazil, by Elizabeth Bishop and LIFE Magazine (1962)

Beautiful Country Burn Again: Democracy, Rebellion, and Revolution, by Ben Fountain

From Dictatorship to Democracy, Gene Sharp *

The Body Keeps the Score: Brain, Mind, and Body in the Healing of Trauma, by Bessel A. van der Volk

Dear America: Notes of an Undocumented Citizen, by Jose Antonio Vargas

* NOTE: on Wednesday, January 31, Gene Sharp passed away peacefully in his home at the age of 90. Professor Sharp is the author of the research and works that sparked the 3.5% Project.

 

Fiction

Florida, by Lauren Groff

 

Short Fiction

“Death Constant Beyond Love,” by Gabriel García Márquez

“Cream,” Haruki Murakami

 

Poetry

Elizabeth Bishop, The Complete Poems: 1927 – 1979

“Resignation,” by Nikki Giovanni

“Knots,” by RD Laing

“Good Bones,” by Maggie Smith

 

Journal

Granta

The Paris Review, No. 227, Winter 2018

 

Essay / Interview / OpEd

“The Quiet American,” by Janine Di Giovanni, The New York Times

The Racist, Homophobic Attack on Jussie Smollett Is Far-Right America’s Endgame, by Joshua Rivera, GQ Magazine

“The Thread: Fatherless,” by Marissa Korbel, The Rumpus

“Teaching my daughter that love is love,” by Vanessa Martir, The Washington Post

“The Radicalization of Bedtime Stories,” by Joe Pinsker, The Atlantic

 

Catalogue

Mt. Airy Learning Tree Winter 2019 Course Catalogue

 

Magazine / Newspaper

Lesbian Connection: free to lesbians worldwide, but the suggested donation is $7/issue (more if you can, less if you can’t), January/February 2019 issue

The New Yorker

The Week

 

Random

HURRAW! moonbalm

worry stone, glass

Mexican tile (coaster)

Pixel computer glasses

Smith’s Rosebud Salve

 

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Method 18 + Ukulele Challenge + #SmockingGun

Today’s post in 3 points:

Ukulele Challenge: On Thursday I posted a new ukulele tune: “Mueller, please hurry up.” People tell me it’s “adorable” and that definitely wasn’t the plan, but whatever – maybe the collective vibe worked, because:

Mueller Investigation: From the Washington Post: “Russians interacted with at least 14 Trump associates during the campaign and transition,” along with this fun graphic. (credit: WashingtonPost) Sh*t’s going DOWN.

Screen Shot 2018-12-10 at 11.56.23 AM

Step 18 in Gene Sharp’s From Dictatorship to Democracy is “Display of Flags and Symbolic Colors.” Some more examples that we’re not just making this sh*T up:

Since November 17, 125,000 protestors have taken to the streets of Paris wearing the yellow vests required to be carried in every vehicle by French law as a protest to rising diesel costs. Although the movement hasn’t been without violence – windows smashed, cars burned, and shops looted – the movement’s core aim “to highlight the economic frustration and political distrust of poorer working families, still has widespread support.” On Friday, the French retail federation told Reuters that retailers have lost about $1.1 billion since the protests first began on November 17, and that the restaurant trade had declined by between 20% and 50%.

As I covered two weeks ago, sustained, silent, nonviolent protest of just a small group of committed members can make lasting change. Kindergarten teacher Sam Goldman is at the helm of Philadelphia’s “Resist Fascism Philly,” and last weekend I’d planned to pull on a red handmaid cloak and do some caroling until the event was cancelled to protest in another location. Pink pussy hats and red handmaid cloaks make a statement wherever they appear. When I’m wearing my kitty hat in my Philly neighborhood, I get smiles and nods, but on the boardwalk in a conservative county New Jersey? Stares. Silence.

That’s the power of Step 18.

Stay the course.

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Step 5: Call Your Senators: Republican Script

It’s time to mobilize. Need to Impeach is circulating a script for calling your Senator to oppose Kavanaugh’s Supreme Court Confirmation, but if you live in a swing state like I do, the script isn’t much help when you’re talking to a Republican Senate office.

LisaMurkowski

Sen. Lisa Murkowski (R-AK) is among four Republican senators who seem the most likely to vote against Brett Kavanaugh. |Drew Angerer/Getty Images

 

Here’s what I plan to say when I call the Republican Senator in my state – and you can say when you call:

Lisa Murkowski: 202-224-6665
Susan Collins: 202-224-2523
Jeff Flake: 202-224-4521
Lindsey Graham: (202) 224-5972

I’m calling to urge Senator [insert Senator name] to vote NO on Brett Kavanaugh’s confirmation.

Brett Kavanaugh’s appearance on September 27 made it clear that he doesn’t have the temperament required of a Supreme Court Judge. As a voter in [your state], I found Dr. Blasey Ford’s testimony to be convincing and credible, and I am in support of an FBI investigation.

However, whatever the results of the FBI investigation may be, I believe that Kavanaugh perjured himself yesterday. Regardless of whether you believe Dr. Blasey Ford, he has shown himself to be a liar with no regard for the process or the laws.

In addition, I’m deeply troubled by Mr. Kavanaugh’s positions on the protections afforded to people with pre-existing conditions guaranteed by the Affordable Care Act. He does not appear to be in favor of American Indian tribes’ rights, something that is important to me as a voter.

Not only this, Kavanaugh believes that sitting presidents should be exempt from criminal prosecution and investigation. If Senator [name] is in favor of this, as a concerned citizen, I will work to make sure that [he/she/they] will not serve another term as an elected official in my state.

Can I count on the Senator to vote NO against Brett Kavanaugh?

To make your call, click here to be connected with Need to Impeach, which offers a prompt that will connect you to your Senator’s office.

Is there anything you’d add to this script? Please leave it in the comments.

Step 5: Declarations of Indictment and Intention

While we’re at it, for all you 3.5 percenters, here’s Step 5 from the blueprint to impeach.

Eyes on the prize.

If this content speaks to you, please share.

Step5

 

 

About the 3.5% Project

The purpose of “The 3.5% Project” is to provide an ongoing context for Harvard professor Gene Sharp’s 198 Methods of Nonviolent Action – a blueprint for nonviolent resistance. Each of the 198 methods can be used at any time, in any order, by anyone. (Scroll below to read the most recent post.) If you’re part of the 3.5%, feel free to subscribe at the top right to receive your weekly method, and please share liberally.

“Researchers used to say that no government can survive if just 5% of its population rose up against it, but what the research showed is that no single campaigns failed during the time period after they’d achieved the active sustained participation of just 3.5 percent of the population.” – Erica Chenoweth

198 METHODS OF NONVIOLENT ACTION

from the Albert Einstein Institute:

THE METHODS OF NONVIOLENT PROTEST AND PERSUASION

Formal Statements
1. Public Speeches
2. Letters of opposition or support
3. Declarations by organizations and institutions
4. Signed public statements
5. Declarations of indictment and intention
6. Group or mass petitions Continue reading