Issue 3 is here!

Let’s jump in.

For our third issue, it has been an absolute joy to collaborate with writer and artist Erin Clark, author of If You Really Love Me, Throw Me Off the Mountain. Erin’s work across film, self portraiture, creative nonfiction, and fiction is a reclaiming of disability in narrative, which is historically and commonly extracted and misused in all areas of art and media. Let Erin’s The Queen of Cups transport you from quarantine life to another shore.

This month’s featured art, Justice for all, features the spectacularly powerful work of contemporary artist Sara Rahbar. A passionate animal rights activist and deeply kind human, Sara says of her work: “Separation and belonging have been persistent themes throughout my life. Reflecting this idea, I attach pieces together until they form a solid unit each belonging to the other. My point of entry as a mixed-media artist has been purposing various types of textiles, wood, bronze and collected objects in ways that present different aspects of their inherent physical characteristics, revealing them in unexpected, unseen ways.”

Check out the Issue 3 highlights from our current team of writers and artists below.

If you’re excited about Khôra, please share the love!

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With our galactic gratitude,

Leigh Hopkins
and the Corporeal Writing Squad


Click to read Khôra.

Issue 3 Highlights

In every issue of Khôra, we feature the work of a curated team of four writers and four artists. This team will change every four months. In addition, we feature the work of one groundbreaking writer and one visual artist.

Here’s what we’re excited about in Issue 3:


The Queen of Cups by featured writer Erin Clark / film by Erin Clark

Writer and multimedia artist Erin Clark is the featured writer for Issue 3. Erin is the author of If You Really Love Me, Throw Me Off the Mountain and co-author of the upcoming Breakup Artist. She is a Canadian world-traveller, world champion and record holder as a parapole athlete, and, as a paragliding pilot, Erin has a wheelchair that can fly.

“The Queen of Cups sits on a throne at the edge of the water. Waves lick her toes and she holds a chalice and symbolizes things. What I always think when I see this tarot card is: someone had to bring in that throne…”

Read The Queen of Cups.


birdgirl by Shane Rowlands / artwork by Lori Lorion

Note: Shane’s piece includes the subject of someone who leaves the world by their own hands. We wanted to mention the sensitive nature of the content to our community.

“Not long after we arrived in Australia, I drew a picture. I know this because my mother kept it and I have it now. Dusty it sits downstairs on top of a chest of drawers. A fading buttery card inside a simple square wooden frame…”

Read birdgirl.

Watch Solidarity Hour

HOLY MOTHER OF OCEANS™ last Friday’s Solidarity Hour was life-giving. We were all vibrating from the intensity of the week, and coming together to make art was pure joy. Thank you to all of you who brought your gorgeous energy to this event. For those of you who weren’t able to join us live, the recording is available now.

Password: Fl8Pr$As



Thank you, thank you, thank you.

We’ll be back with Issue 3 at the end of the month.

With our galactic gratitude,

Leigh Hopkins

and the Corporeal Writing Squad

Issue 2 and Post-Election Solidarity Hour

Welcome to Issue 2! If you’re new here, in September 2020Khôra entered the global literary village on the back of a glittery wave. Thank you for the spectacularly supportive welcome. We love you, too.

Everyone we know is vibrating with ten thousand emotions—fluctuating between doom-scrolling, activism, carefully moderated H-O-P-E, and preemptive despair. We hope that this month’s issue will fill you with writing and works of art that reach some of the places that need tending.

Let’s jump in.

We’re thrilled to share that this month’s featured writer is the brilliant, brave-hearted Megan Stielstra. Megan is a beloved award-winning essayist and the author of three collections: The Wrong Way To Save Your LifeOnce I Was Cool, and Everyone Remain Calm. She is currently a 2020 Shearing Fellow at the Black Mountain Institute in Las Vegas…and that’s where Megan will be calling in from when she joins us as a reader for our Khôra Launch Party & Solidarity Hour on November 6 at 4pm PT / 7pm ET.

If you’re a subscriber, you’ll receive a Zoom link on the morning of the event. Save the date. We can’t wait to see you!

Subscribe now

When you subscribe to Khôra for free, you’ll receive issue highlights straight to your inboxSubscribers will also receive extra goodies like access to our Zoom happy hour, occasional speaker series, subscriber-only posts, virtual care packages, and more to come. We want to reiterate our philosophy that no one will be turned away due to lack of funds. If you are able to pay for a subscription, we love you, and you help to build access for others. If you’re not able to pay for a subscription, we love you, and welcome to the revolution.

In the meantime, if you’re excited about Khôra, please share us with a friend.

With our galactic gratitude,

Leigh Hopkins and the Corporeal Writing Squad

Click here to read Khôra.


Issue 2 Highlights

In every issue of Khôra, we feature the work of a curated team of four writers and four artists. This team will change every four months. In addition, we feature the work of one groundbreaking writer and one visual artist.

Here’s what we’re excited about in Issue 2:


5:45 by Megan Stielstra

“The lockdown started eight months ago but a hundred years have passed since then or maybe just snap your fingers. I’m forty-five years old in my mother’s basement in Michigan and thirty-three years old giving birth in a blizzard in Chicago and thirty-one years old getting married on a beach at sunset and twenty-eight years old falling in love and twenty-two years old falling in love…”

Read 5:45.

NEW! Meet Khôra

Meet Khôra, a dynamic online arts space produced in collaboration with groundbreaking author Lidia Yuknavitch’s Corporeal Writing. Plato described khôra as a “formless interval, alike to a non-being,” and in that spirit, Khôra is committed to writers and artists who explore the creative by and through an ever-evolving and expansive lens. We are honored to showcase the work of polyphonic, multi-genre writers and artists. 

Share Khôra

Every month, Khôra will publish new work from a curated team of writers and artists. When you subscribe for free, you’ll receive issue highlights straight to your inbox (no one will be turned away due to lack of funds). Subscribers will also receive extra goodies like access to our Zoom happy hour, occasional speaker series, subscriber-only posts, virtual care packages, and more to come. The extras might take a month or so to get going… and in the meantime, we think you’ll love what you read!

Click here to read Khôra.


Issue 1 Highlights

In every issue of Khôra, we will feature the work of a curated team of four writers and four artists. This team will change every four months. In addition, we feature the work of one groundbreaking writer and one visual artist.

Here’s what we’re excited about in Issue 1:


Tug by Diana Khoi Nguyen

Poet and multimedia artist Diana Khoi Nguyen is the featured writer for Khôra’s inaugural issue. She is the author of Ghost Of, which was selected by Terrance Hayes for the Omnidawn Open Contest in 2018. Among her many awards, Diana was also a finalist for the National Book Award and L.A. Times Book Prize. Her exquisite piece, Tug, is made of both visual and written texts, and is on display as a gallery of four images. 

Read Tug.






Method 47: Assemblies of protest or support

On April 3, 2020, sailors chanted “Crozier, Crozier!” after Navy Captain Brett E. Crozier was fired for his email to Navy leaders, detailing the service’s failures in dealing with a coronavirus outbreak on the U.S.S. Theodore Roosevelt.

Method 47 in History

“Strijdom, you have tampered with the women, You have struck a rock.”

– South African Women’s March, August 1956 

In South Africa, pass laws were a form of internal passport system designed to segregate the population, severely limiting the movements of not only black African citizens by requiring them to carry pass books when outside their homelands or designated areas. In the 1950s, the primary catalysts of the anti-pass protests were thousands of African women, many of whom had never been involved in demonstrations. In 1956, thousands of South African women of all races marched to Pretoria to stand in support of black South African women, singing to the Prime Minister: “”Strijdom, you have tampered with the women, You have struck a rock.”

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Method 46: Homage at Burial Places

Today marks the 36th anniversary of the unsolved murder of Swedish Prime Minister Olof Palme. As a Social Democrat, Palme didn’t hire bodyguards or armored cars; he felt that it was important not to create distance between himself and the people of Sweden. On Friday night, February 28, 1986, Palme and his wife Lisbet were walking home from dinner in Stockholm when an unidentified gunman fired a single round in the Prime Minister’s back.

Since then, Olof Palme’s grave in central Stockholm has become a place of homage. To many Swedes, Palme was more than a politician, he was a hero who was responsible for creating Sweden’s healthy welfare system, among other leftwing policies that also made him despised by the right.

To this day, Palme’s grave is marked by red roses, a symbol of Social Democracy.

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Blood Feast / The Rumpus

The latest installment of my column, Turning Purple, is up this week at The Rumpus. “Blood Feast” is centered around my time canvassing in Trump country and the roots of my activism. Check out the photos on Instagram.

“In every story I read to my class, the villains were my student’s uncle, who recognized me at a club, kissing a girl. At parent-teacher conferences the next week, the girl’s parents glared at me with their arms folded, finally shouting what are you teaching our daughter, without saying what they knew. I shook next to the principal, certain that I was about to be outed, arrested or fired. When that didn’t happen, I decided it was time for my third graders to learn about activism. I wanted to find out what mattered to eight-year-olds.”

– excerpt from Blood Feast, The Rumpus

A FINAL NOTE: On Tuesday night, the efforts of volunteers around the country paid off at the polls. If you’re looking for a therapeutic and easy way to get involved in the 2020 election, write to Postcards to Voters to join the party. #PostcardstoVoters

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What’s on my Nightstand: October 2019

Nonfiction

Be Here Now | Ram Dass | Hanuman Foundation

White Fragility: Why it’s So Hard for White People to Talk About Racism | Robin Diangelo | Beacon Press

Burn it Down: Women Writing About Anger | Edited by Lilly Dancyger | Seal Press

The Cost of Living | Deborah Levy | Penguin Books

PEACE: 50 Years of Protest | Barry Miles

The Wrong Way to Save Your Life | Megan Stielstra | Harper Perennial

Short Fiction

White Dancing Elephants | Chaya Bhuvaneswar | Dzanc Books

The Best American Short Stories | Edited by Roxane Gay | Mariner Books

Poetry

You Should Feel Bad | Laura Cresté | No Tokens

Two Poems by Camonghne Felix | Camonghne Felix | PEN America

Failed Essay on Privilege | Elisa Gonzalez | The New Yorker (listen)

Essay (selected)

Impossible Hope | Amy Bond | The Rumpus

Alt. Latino Playlist: Songs That Shout Protest | Felix Contreras | NPR

It Comes in Waves | Lilly Dancyger | Longreads

How to Lose a Third of a Million Dollars Without Really Trying | Heather Demetrios | Forge

Born Again: Rene Denfeld On The Birth Of Love | Rene Denfeld | Ravishly

Bikini Kill – and my Bunkmates – Taught Me How to Unleash My Anger | Melissa Febos | Longreads

Your Healing Crystals Are Part of the Capitalist Exploitation Machine | Aaron Gilbreath | Longreads

Voices on Addiction: The Promises | Cameron Dezen Hammon | The Rumpus

How to Mourn a Glacier | Lacy M. Johnson

Keeping My Promise to Popo | Anne Liu Kellor | Longreads

Marissa Korbel | Why We Cry When We’re Angry | Guernica (or

A History of My Body | Joe Nasta | ENTROPY

Why I Teach | Viet Thanh Nguyen | The New York Times

Vision | Susan Power | GRANTA

Of Braids and Blades: Fighting the Ghosts of Kashmir | Amrita Sharma and Peerzada Raouf | Wasafiri

Inherited Anger | Marisa Siegel​ | Burn it Down

Spines of the Finwoman | Lidia Yuknavitch | The Rumpus

Interview / OpEd / Review

Experiments show this is the best way to win campaigns. But is anyone actually doing it? | David Brookman and Josua Kala | Vox

About That “A-Word” Barbara J. King on animal emotions, anthropomorphism, and the future of the planet | Mark Moring | Orbiter

President Trump is at war with the rule of law. This won’t end well | Rebecca Solnit | The Guardian

Real Life – Brandon Taylor | Review | Publishers Weekly

“I wanted my characters to inhabit spaces outside what’s expected for queer and trans people—especially joyful spaces.” Talking to author Claire Rudy Foster about their new book – Shine of the Ever | Lisa Walls | ISTORIALIT

Verge – by Lidia Yuknavitch | Review | Kirkus Review

Why the Trump Impeachment Inquiry Is the Only Option “After all, Americans have seen this playbook before. During the 2016 campaign, Mr. Trump called on Russia to find emails he hoped would embarrass Hillary Clinton: “Russia, if you’re listening, I hope you’re able to find the 30,000 emails that are missing,” he bellowed then at a campaign news conference in Florida. Mr. Mueller subsequently showed that Russian agents tried to hack into Mrs. Clinton’s personal servers that same day … that Mr. Trump was not dissuaded by the response to Mr. Mueller’s findings from seeking political aid from another foreign source suggests he has learned nothing except that he is free to try anything — that a president may use the office as he chooses to promote his re-election.” 

The Editorial Board | The New York Times

Magazine / Journal / Newspaper / Pamphlet

No Tokens | Issue No. 8

Lesbian Connection: free to lesbians worldwide, but the suggested donation is $7/issue (more if you can, less if you can’t), May/June 2019 issue

The New Yorker

The Week

TIME

Music

El Machete | Ani Cordero | Spotify

Random

Postcards to Kentucky Voters #DitchMitch (It’s a fantastic stress reliever – sign up here.)

lip balm

ginger cookies

earbuds

cold cup of coffee

AA battery

Pixel eyewear

list of Horsham Township Council candidates

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VOTER REGISTRATION DAY: Take the quiz!

Today is National Voter Registration Day. How much do you know about voting and elections? Take CNN’s quiz. Another easy thing you can do today to help is to share the link to this page on usa.gov.

Tweet it out or share it on Facebook.

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